Mohamad, Marde Tanhaye Shab

The new music video by Mohamad has been released exclusively on Radio Javan.  The video was directed by Solmaz Niki- Kermani of Mahtab Entertainment using original footage from her film To the Moon which she starred in and wrote. To the Moon was directed by Damian Harris.

Mahan Esfahani

Mahan Esfahani (Persian: ماهان اصفهانی ) is an Iranian-American keyboardist; he is the first harpsichordist named as a BBC Radio 3 New Generation Artist. As a concerto soloist, recitalist, and collaborative musician, he has gained an international reputation on a variety of early keyboards.

Born in 1984 in Tehran, Esfahani grew up in United States. While at Stanford University, Esfahani studied musicology and came most seriously under the influence of the American scholar George Houle.[2] Later, he continued his harpsichord studies with the Australian harpsichordist Peter Watchorn in Boston and with the Italian organist Lorenzo Ghielmi in Milan, and benefited from the advice and guidance of the Czech harpsichordist Zuzana Růžičková.

Having quickly gained an international reputation without the benefit of going through the customary competitions, played many significant concerts,he has been praised as “exceptionally gifted” (The Times) and for “the virtuosity of a master” (Keyboard Magazine).,currently he is as Artist-in-Residence at New College, Oxford. He made his Wigmore Hall debut in 2009 as a concerto soloist with The English Concert, and in the same year performed at the BBC Proms’ chamber series and made extensive recordings of concerto and solo repertoire for the harpsichord for BBC Radio 3.

From 2008-2010 Mahan Esfahani was a BBC Radio 3 New Generation Artist. Currently he is the first and only early instrument specialist to have joined the programme.

Respected for gaining attention for the harpsichord as a concert instrument, Mahan Esfahani is known for his criticism of what he perceives as the many dogmas of the early music movement, preferring to use many of his own editions and conclusions gained from the close reading of period sources, and works actively with modern instrument players in re-creating the sonic world of earlier music. He is also well known for his advocacy of contemporary music and has played numerous new commissions.

Esfahani is managed by Rayfield Allied of London. He was the recipient of a Borletti Buitoni Trust Award in 2009, being the first harpsichordist and first Iranian to do so. He has continued his work in bringing the harpsichord to the mainstream of Classical Music, and in 2011 made history with the first solo harpsichord recital at the BBC Proms.

He also started to make a name as a conductor and director, appearing with such ensembles as The Academy of Ancient Music, The Manchester Camerata, the Hanover Band

Mahan Esfahani

Mahan Esfahani (Persian: ماهان اصفهانی ) is an Iranian-American keyboardist; he is the first harpsichordist named as a BBC Radio 3 New Generation Artist. As a concerto soloist, recitalist, and collaborative musician, he has gained an international reputation on a variety of early keyboards.

Born in 1984 in Tehran, Esfahani grew up in United States. While at Stanford University, Esfahani studied musicology and came most seriously under the influence of the American scholar George Houle.[2] Later, he continued his harpsichord studies with the Australian harpsichordist Peter Watchorn in Boston and with the Italian organist Lorenzo Ghielmi in Milan, and benefited from the advice and guidance of the Czech harpsichordist Zuzana Růžičková.

Having quickly gained an international reputation without the benefit of going through the customary competitions, played many significant concerts,he has been praised as “exceptionally gifted” (The Times) and for “the virtuosity of a master” (Keyboard Magazine).,currently he is as Artist-in-Residence at New College, Oxford. He made his Wigmore Hall debut in 2009 as a concerto soloist with The English Concert, and in the same year performed at the BBC Proms’ chamber series and made extensive recordings of concerto and solo repertoire for the harpsichord for BBC Radio 3.

From 2008-2010 Mahan Esfahani was a BBC Radio 3 New Generation Artist. Currently he is the first and only early instrument specialist to have joined the programme.

Respected for gaining attention for the harpsichord as a concert instrument, Mahan Esfahani is known for his criticism of what he perceives as the many dogmas of the early music movement, preferring to use many of his own editions and conclusions gained from the close reading of period sources, and works actively with modern instrument players in re-creating the sonic world of earlier music. He is also well known for his advocacy of contemporary music and has played numerous new commissions.

Esfahani is managed by Rayfield Allied of London. He was the recipient of a Borletti Buitoni Trust Award in 2009, being the first harpsichordist and first Iranian to do so. He has continued his work in bringing the harpsichord to the mainstream of Classical Music, and in 2011 made history with the first solo harpsichord recital at the BBC Proms.

He also started to make a name as a conductor and director, appearing with such ensembles as The Academy of Ancient Music, The Manchester Camerata, the Hanover Band, The English Concert, and Arion Baroque Orchestra of Montreal

Dariush Eghbali

Dariush Eghbali (Persian: داریوش اقبالی ‎, Dāryūš Eqbālī) better known by his stage name Dariush is a famous Iranian pop singer best known for his warm and plaintive bass voice heard in both ballads and political songs.[1] He is also a social activist who directs a recovery center.

Dariush was born in Tehran , on February 4, 1951 and spent his early years in Karaj. His talent was first recognized at an early age of nine, when he appeared on stage at his school. Hassan Khayatbashi introduced him to the public at the age of twenty through Iranian television. He immediately became popular with his legendary song “Don’t Tell Me You Love Me”.[3] His contemporary and unique style opened up a new era in Iranian music. His past drug use has been publicized heavily. He has since quit.

His body of work consists of over 208 songs in 27 albums. He has also performed many Iranian films.

Dariush has released album called Donyaye In Roozaye Man which has been released on June 1, 2010 and recently the new song ‘Divar’ on August 9, 2011.

Dariush is a member of Amnesty International. Having had the experience of drug abuse himself in the past,[4] he is heavily involved in bringing awareness and support to the world of addiction.[4] Through the establishment of the Iran Recovery Center and Ayeneh Foundation, as well as through websites, educational seminars and conferences around the world, he has used his celebrity status to promote a drug free lifestyle.

His contributions have been recognized by the Self-Help And Recovery Exchange, which selected him to receive the Ron Simmons & Rev, Ronald L. Wright Award, for his outstanding contribution to support group participation by minority communities.

Hichkas

Soroush Lashkari (Persian: سروش لشکری‎; born May 10, 1985) better known by his stage name Hichkas (Persian: هیچکس‎; meaning “Nobody”)is an Iranian rapper based in Tehran. Hichkas is considered[by whom?] as one of pioneers of “Persian Rap” and “Persian Urban music“.  He has never received official permission to release his music legally in Iran since most western-style music is banned in the country.

Hichkas is one of the first Iranian Rappers that his works has made success.In about 2003, he started his works in Vanak with covering some English Language songs.Hichkas gained attention when he began rapping in Persian about social problems and young generation in Iran.Releasing his first album, made his name much reputable in Iranian community.  Hichkas has a unique theistic and nationalisitic lyrics style, avoiding vulgar words, referring to social issues

Iranian Actors & Actresses

Ahmad Ghadakchian Ahmad Najafi Ahmad Saatchian Akbar Abdi Ali Ghorbanzadeh Ali Mosaffa Ali Nassirian

Ali Sadeghi

Ali Sadeghi

Ali Sadeghi Amin Hayai Amin Nazemzadeh Amin Tarokh Amir Jafari Amrolah Saberi Atila Pesyani

Bagher Sahraroodi

Bagher Sahraroodi

Bagher Sahraroodi Bahman Farmanara Bahman Ghobadi Bahman Mofid Bahman Zarrinpour Bahram Radan Behrouz Vossoughi Behzad Farahani Bizhan Emkanian

Bob Yari

Bob Yari

Bob Yari Bijan Daneshmand Sirous Ebrahimzadeh Danial Hakimi Dariush Arjmand Davoud Rashidi Enayat Bakhshi Esmat Safavi Ezzatollah Entezami Ezatallah Ramezanifar Bijan Daneshmand Faramarz Gharibian Fariborz Arabnia Farokhlagha Hushmand Fazlollah Yousefpour Fath Ali Oveisi

Firouz Behjat-Mohamadi

Firouz Behjat-Mohamadi

Firouz Behjat-Mohamadi Garsha Habib Rezaei Hadi Eslami Hamid Goudarzi Hamid Tamjidi Hamed Komeyli Hasan Khayat-Bashi Hamid Farrokhnezhad Hamid Jebeli Homayoun Ershadi Hosein Amirfazli Hossien Panahi Hossein Sarshar Hossein Kasbian Hossein Yari

Iraj Ghaderi

Iraj Ghaderi

Iraj Ghaderi Iraj Rad Iraj Tahmasb Jahangir Almasi Jahangir Forouhar Jalal Pishvaian Javad Razavian Jamshid Hashempour Jamshid Layegh Jamshid Mashayekhi Kayvon Zand Khosrow Shakibaee

Kambiz Dirbaz

Kambiz Dirbaz

Kambiz Dirbaz Mahmoud Pakniat Majid Majidi Majid Mozaffari Mansour Mehdi Bajestani Mehdi Fathi Mehdi Hashemi Mehdi Solouki Mehran Ghafoorian Mehran Modiri Mohammed Ghaffari Mohamad Kasebi Mohammad Ali Fardin Mohammad Ali Keshavarz Mohamad Ali Sepanlou Mohammad Reza Foroutan

Mohammad Reza Golzar

Mohammad Reza Golzar

Mohammad Reza Golzar Mohammad Reza Jozi

Mohammad Reza Sharifinia

Mohammad Reza Sharifinia

Mohammad Reza Sharifinia Mohammad Reza Zandi Morteza Ahmadi Morteza Shayesteh Nasser Malekmoti’e

Navid Negahban

Navid Negahban

Navid Negahban Nozar Azari Nosratolah Vahdat Nosratolah Karimi Omid Djalili Parsa Pirouzfar Parisa DeFaie Parvin Dowlatshahi Parviz Fannizadeh

Parviz Parastouee

Parviz Parastouee

Parviz Parastouee Parviz Pourhosseini Parviz Sayyad Pejman Bazeghi Rambod Javan Reza Jhian Reza Kianian Reza Rouygari Reza Shafiei Jam Reza Salehi Sadegh Bahrami Saeed Poursamimi Saeed Rad

Setareh Eskandari

Setareh Eskandari

Setareh Eskandari Shahab Hosseini Shahram Haghighat Doost Siavash Tahmasb Solmaz Niki Kermani

Solmaz Niki-Kermani

Solmaz Niki-Kermani

Soroush Sehhat Soroush Goudarzi Tahmoures Tehrani

Tahmoures Tehrani

Tahmoures Tehrani

Hamid Taati Valiyollah Shirandami Yousef Teymouri

Farewell Baghdad

Farewell Baghdad (Persian: بدرود بغداد‎) is a 2010 Iranian film directed by Mehdi Naderi. The film was selected as the Iranian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 83rd Academy Awards,[1][2] but it did not make the final shortlist.

The Polish-American boxer Daniel Dalca (Mazdak Mirabedini) escapes his problems by enlisting in the army. After four years when his mission is over, he was to sent back home where he would have to face his past problems. So he decides to desert the army. In the middle of a desert he gets bitten by a scorpion.

On the very day of her marriage, 29 March 2003 Rebecca (Pantea Bahram) lost her husband during the British-American attack on Iraq. Today she’s managing a little restaurant on the Iraqi borderline where she hosts Iraqi and American soldiers. She goes to the landmines to clear mines in order to plant trees and palms at the very same places.

Saleh Al Marzouk (Mostafa Zamani) is an Iraqi math teacher who lost his family on the 29 March Baghdad bombings. Meanwhile he detained and later imprisoned at the infamous Abu Ghraib prison for three years. Disguised as a woman, he plans to blow himself up at a restaurant on Christmas Day in 2009. There, he suddenly discovers a picture of himself on the wall, when Rebecca enters the restaurant. Shocked, Saleh runs away.

  • Mazdak Mirabedini as Daniel Dalca
  • Pantea Bahram as Rebecca
  • Mostafa Zamani as Saleh Al Marzouk
  • Cris Cyrus Saidi as Lt. Sean Miller
  • Reza Mohammady as Cpl. Nick Wilson
  • Majid Bahrami
  • Arya Shakeri
  • Adnan Shahtalai